Bear River photos

All posts tagged Bear River photos

A Great Reason to celebrate!

Published September 2, 2013 by thebearrivertides

The weather was perfect, and the occasion sublime!  The grand opening of the Bear River Millyard cottages was a complete success in every way!

Those interested in the exciting development of the Bear River Recreation Millyard , and the future of Bear River, gathered on the shores of Bear River on Aug. 17 for a fun filled evening of food, music and comraderie.  During the course of the evening the guests were treated to a look at the fabulous new accommodations, a glimpse of the new book about Bear River, fabulous food, remarks about the development of the property and delightful music by George Sloane, Dan Lagan, Jack Fuller and guest flutist, Ai.

The little yellow houses are the brilliant design of Frank Zimmeck, a true artist, and the guests delighted in the remarkable detail work that adorn  the cottages.  In fact, they delighted in everything about them…especially the view!

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The Bear River Winter Carnival: February 14-17/2013

Published February 18, 2013 by thebearrivertides

The Sixth Annual Bear River Winter carnival took place with rave reviews and while the weather was too mild for skating and too stormy on Sunday for the long trek events, the whole shebang was definitely a success and we all look forward to next year’s version.

And the fireworks were amazing!

Thanks to all the volunteers who put it together….

The week of Sept. 8 to 15 2012

Published September 16, 2012 by thebearrivertides

 

In Bear River, Nova Scotia this week…

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The Annapolis Highland Winery held their third annual fall festival and the weather was perfect, as was the food and wine.  Music on the deck had everyone relaxed and enjoying the view while sampling different vintages from this award winning winery.  Bear River is fortunate indeed to have such a thriving and exceptional enterprise in our backyard!

The Bass Fishing Tournament was held on Sept. 15 with absolutely no fish caught.  But as co-chair Fred Miller said: “No big deal; everyone had a great time anyway and that’s what it’s all about!”

But someone caught a big one….The Winner of the $1000 prize for biggest fish from the Bear River Millyard Recreation is Brian (B.J) Trimper.  Nice job guys…congratulations!

This one didn’t get away!

 

 

Sept. 1-8/2012 The week in Photos

Published September 8, 2012 by thebearrivertides

The week that was….

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In other happenings.

We regret to announce the passing of  Harry Ellis on Sept. 6,. Condolences to his family and friends.

The children of  Bear River went back to school.  Watch out for those school buses.

Francois Bellefontaine  traveled to the Eastern Shore for a few days for a visit with his sister.

It is great to see Brian and Jill Chapman back in town for a while!

It is sad to announce the passing of Carl Goldberg on Saturday, Sept. 8.  Condolences to all his family and friends.

 

Millyard Day; down by the river….

Published August 25, 2012 by thebearrivertides

 

There was lots of fun on Millyard day, August 18, down at the Bear River Millyard Recreation.  While there were no takers for the mud race, there was still a great time to be had.

There used to be a number of sawmills in Bear River and Bob Benson has put together a great display with the names of those who worked in the mills and some great photos of former glory.  Also on display is a tribute to Bill Morine, fisherman extrordinaire of Bear River.

It doesn’t have to be Millyard day to drop down and enjoy some social time and great buys.  the Millyard Market is open on Saturdays from 10 to 3.

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Here are some of the things you will find…

 

Cherrry Carnival 2012

Published July 24, 2012 by thebearrivertides

 

Bear River has another Cherry Carnival under its belt for a total of 119.  The weather was perfect.

The photos tell the story….

The children’s parade starts it off….

And then the parade and greased pole!

The beginning…

.

…… the middle….

…. the end!

 

Ron Parks, Earl Waterman and Nathan Waterman entertain the crowd with some golden oldies!

 

Everyone loves the Fireman’s Canteen!

 

Jumping off some of that cotton candy energy!

 

Louise Woods gives some friendly tourism advice.

 

Remember: it’s all about helping the Fire Department!

 

and then of course the grand finale….the fireworks!

 

lighting up the sky.

A big thank you to the Bear River Volunteer Fire Department for all their hard work putting it all together!

 

 

 

 

 

A Visit to The New Heritage Museum

Published June 9, 2012 by thebearrivertides

view of the tool exhibit

The grand opening of the NEW Bear River Heritage Museum took place June 9th.  The new premises at the Oakdene Center is much smaller than previous quarters,  but there sure is lots of light.

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The museum will open for regular hours in July and August. Look for workshops and demonstrations!

Signs of Spring: revised

Published April 21, 2012 by thebearrivertides

Spring is really happening in Bear River!  Here are a few of the tell-tale signs.

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History and Stories of Bear River: Ethel and Ancil Ellis

Published April 3, 2012 by thebearrivertides

The most recent pamphlet we can find written by a resident of Bear River about the village is “History and Stories of Bear River, The Switzerland of Nova Scotia.”  

This wonderful glimpse of the village, complete with photos, was written in May,1977.  Here is it reproduced digitally for your enjoyment. Click on image to enlarge.

Unfortunately Ancil and Ethel Ellis have both passed on,  but with enough encouragement, maybe another “old timer” will tell you a few stories.

Bear River History from 1893

Published April 2, 2012 by thebearrivertides

The document reprinted here has no identified author.  If anyone has any ideas as to who it was written by, please let us know.

Nestled among the hills, along both sides of the stream which for some distance forms the boundary lines between the counties of Annapolis and Digby, stands the bustling, enterprising community, which, collectively, is known as Bear River.  The parts on each side of the river belong to different municipalities, and in some respects, diverse interests.  A few years ago an attempt was made to complete the diverse between the two sections  of the town by giving to each a distinct name, that part on the Annapolis side being called Bridgeport, and that on the Digby side, Hillsburg.   But this attempt to diverse what nature had joined together proved abortive, and these names are now seldom heard, while the general name used to designate both communities as one town remains fixed, doubtless, permanently.  If we mistake not, the sections on each side have formed a union for educational purposes, and at their present rate of progress, the community of interest existing between both, may draw them into more complete union, of a municipal  nature, at no very distant day.

The stream divides the two sides; foreground, Bridgeport, background, Hillsburg

Several explanations have been advanced as to the derivation of the name of this town. A recent writer claims its origin as derived from the French pronounciation of Imbert, a gentleman who formed one of the party visiting this spot as early as 1611.

From the date of the French occupation of the country, 1604, to the date of their expulsion  in 1755, it is believed that no settlement was made as no remains have been found on which to ground an opposite assertion, and the town is, doubtless, of exclusive English origin.  With the invasion  of the United Empire Loyalists, the settlement of the district commenced, and in 1784, the township of Clements, including both sides of the stream, was granted to certain English, Hessians, and Waldeckians who had served during the old revolutionary war, and who, at its close, received grants of land, in lieu of pay for the services they had rendered in that unfortunate struggle.

The first frame house was erected by one Capt. O’Sullivan Sutherland, and stood nearly midway up the slope of the eastern hill, and adjacent to the present residence of Captain J.Harris.  The housewarming, given on the occasion of the completion was a merry-making of no ordinary description. Everybody who was entitled to be somebody was invited and music, dancing and drinking made the hours reseate until the dawn of the next day.  Among the guests were the Demoliters, the Hertricks, Kyshes, Callecks, Vreens, Ditmarses, Boehlers, Purdys, Joneses and others whose names do not now occur to our memory.   Perhaps there has been not so jolly a party in the place from that day to this.

Before the completion of this first framed dwelling,  a number of log huts had been built and occupied by both German and English settlers, and the work of clearing the soil for cultivation had commenced, but with so little success owing to the ignorance of the proprietors, that much want and suffering was felt by their families  for several years to come.

Towards the close of the century, there was considerable movement from the townships of Granville and Annapolis, to the hill country on the shores of Bear River.  At was at this period that the Clarkes, the Millers,the Troops, Dodges, the Rices, the Chutes and the Harrises bought lands and settled in the district, a course they were induced to take in the belief that wheat and other cereals could be produced in larger quantities and of finer quality there than could be raised on the same sized areas elsewhere in the county, and  the descendants of these men today constitute a large percentage of the population, both of the village and its immediate vicinity.

early farming in Bear River

Still, up to the  date under review, 1790 to 1810, there had been no village visible, but soon after sawmills began the work of  transforming the timber up the streams into lumber, necessitating the inception of shipbuilding, which was almost contemporaneously begun, stores were erected, and a thriving town was the final result.  No less than seven or eight public highways  converge upon the present town from different directions, and not an hour passes without the arrival of vehicles laden with freights for export or passengers on business or pleasure. Substantial and comfortable dwellings line the hilly streets in all directions, which at every point new aspects in landscape scenery.  Neat fruit and vegetable gardens and lawns are attached to nearly every domicile in the town and thrift and comfort everywhere give evidence of vital existence.

freight arriving in Bear River?

Today, the greater number of stores are on the Annapolis side, where Clarke Bros. have become the leader in Bear River in business matters, although there are a number of new and well furnished ones on the west side of the river.

The jewel of the Clarke Brothers commercial empire

The town also has fine places of worship, the Baptists being the leading denomination.  Within the past year, they have remodeled their church, making it one of the handsomest in the town.  The Methodists and adherents to the English church have each neat pretty religious edifices on the north side of the river, and the Adventists have also a house of worship.

left to right: Anglican Church, Oakdene School, Methodist Church

Bear River has sent from its shipyards many vessels, some of large tonnage, constructed by such efficient master builders as Mr. Thomas Rice, Captain John Benson, the Lents, and others which carried away freights of lumber , cordwood, pulpwood, and other products of the forests, for which it is noted , to ports in the United States, the West Indies, etc., and commanded by our skillful and intelligent native captains.

loading the ships with Bear River lumber

This delightful resort among the hills has also gained a deal of notoriety owing to its mammoth yield and great variety of cherries, and is visited, during the season, by excursionists from distant parts of the counties of Annapolis,  Digby,  and elsewhere, to enjoy to their heart’s content, a feast of the luscious fruits.  Besides the hundreds of others, here and there may be seen a majestic cherry tree planted by the French during their occupancy in the country, which serve as historical landmarks to that period.

The construction of the so-called missing link of railway from Annapolis to Digby, and the building of a new highway from the town to the depot, located some four miles distant, proved a great boom to the commercial interests of the entire locality, affording as it does more direct communication with the principle avenues of travel.

Within the past year, electric light has been introduced, driven by one of the best water powers to be found in the country, while the many other improvements in the way of new dwellings, a $7000. schoolhouse and other evidences of prosperity and wealth mark the town  as one of the most progressive in the western part of the province.

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